Why Affirmations for Little Boys? What About Little Girls?

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Although Arise Little Man has not even yet been released, publishing this book is something I have dreamed of for many years. Not only is writing and publishing a book a massive undertaking, but I always had those little voices in my head making me doubt myself and question everything.

  • Who would even read this book?
  • Will it be good enough?
  • Am I wasting my time?

I spent a long time—probably too long—allowing these negative thoughts to cloud my determination. I am not only a mother, but I also have a full-time job, so it was pretty easy to let life get in the way of my dreams. However, after much prayer and encouragement from friends and family, I began the quest to publish my book about a year ago. And now that I am (almost) on the other side of the journey, I am so thrilled with where it has taken me. Frankly, I owe it all to my two sons, Demi and Tobi, who are my muses.

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Over the years, I have always made sure to remind my boys just how loved they are and what distinguished men I know they will grow up to be. Nothing against my fellow women, but once I became a mother, I couldn’t help but notice there was a gap in children’s stories and movies that genuinely empower little boys. Growing up, I was sure to find a Disney princess around every corner, from the animated films to the toys, and, of course, the dashing prince or wanderer ready to swoop in and complement her majesty. But where were the stories just about little princes and their trials and tribulations navigating their strengths and weaknesses toward their happily ever after?

From the classics—Ariel, Belle, Snow White, and Cinderella—to the modern era—Tiana, Moana, and Elsa—little girls have had several notable fierce, brave and resilient kid-friendly models to look up to or, at the very least, fantasize about being or aspire to emulate. On the other hand, save for the cliché prince charming role to go along with the princesses mentioned above, little boys haven’t benefited from as many sources of affirmation in children-focused media or pop culture.

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Cue my inspiration for Arise Little Man. I wrote this book with one clear goal in mind: to empower little boys—our precious princes—to grow into noble kings. Regardless of race or financial status, there should be no little boy in the world who questions whether or not he is enough. In a world where we habitually compliment our little girls, so too should we commend our little boys, assuage their fears, and affirm their beauty—inside and out.

In conclusion, I hope that Arise Little Man is just the beginning of a movement that inspires the villages that raise our children to develop the habit of telling little boys and young men that it is okay to want to receive attention, feel loved and need encouragement. I hope that it reminds us to tell our sons that none of these natural desires make them “a little girl” and none is a sign of weakness, but a sign of strength. On the contrary, these desires—to be hugged, to be kissed, to cry and to be comforted when they do—are natural, and a sign of what makes them, like the rest of us, equally human.

My debut children's book is now available to order. Click the button below to purchase your copy now.